Next Generation Ambassadors

Harry Harrison

Harry Harrison, Assistant Manager, Honingham Thorpe Farms

Age – 24
Type of farming enterprise – Arable and fresh produce

Day to day role
One day can offer such a wide variation, from machinery maintenance through to crop production. It can be as simple as ensuring the correct parts reach the correct people, through to managing crop storage of which we boast 20,000t’s. The potato production consumes the largest proportion of my time from cultivations, planting and irrigation through to preparation for the following crop.

Where would you like to see yourself and the business in 5 years’ time?
Within the next five years I would hope that I can start having a positive change on the business, increasing my personal skills while improving the farming practice. Monitoring and managing soil and in turn crop health. Improving worker awareness of techniques, methods and reasons behind cultivations, links between ballast; tyre wear, diesel use and metal work expenses. As the business progresses over the next few years it will host new challenges to undertake, overcome and increase my skill set. We are keen to increase the use of technology as an on farm aid to improve day to day efficiencies, looking into available technology such as iPads and electronic spray and fertiliser recommendations. I would like to be able to bring forward ideas of how we can harness this technology in as many areas as possible, it could play such a key role in agriculture in the coming years. For example, e-passports are being trialled already this year.

What does being a part of the Next Generation Group mean to you and what do you personally gain from it?
This group enables a similar generation of like-minded people to express, swap and challenge ideas. With the aid of talks and tours from professionals within or around the industry it provides a wealth of directed knowledge that we are then free to implement improve or tailor to suit our individual environment. Opportunities are far easier to access as a group, people are far more forthcoming with information to a group instead of an individual.

Jamie Seaman

Jamie Seaman, Land Agent, Sentry Limited

Age – 27
Type of farming enterprise – Arable, livestock and consultancy

Day to day role
Negotiate terms and submit tenders on behalf of Sentry (Contract farming, Tenancies, Management agreements). Providing consultancy advice on a range of areas, from Estate Management, Single Payment/ Basic Payment Scheme, Environmental Schemes, farm Valuations, Planning, Compensation claims, farm sales and purchases, diversification opportunities.

Where would you like to see yourself and the business in 5 years’ time?
I enjoy my current role immensely and I am happy to work my way up the career ladder within Sentry, I am having more and more involvement with the farm business at home and would like this to continue. I have a particular interest in the suckler herd and would like to increase my input on the business side of the livestock enterprise. Sentry as a business are keen to expand. On the back of the dramatic decline in commodity prices the firm historically takes on new clients in times of austerity and this is something we are focussed on achieving presently.

What does being a part of the Next Generation Group mean to you and what do you personally gain from it?
The group is great for learning and interacting with other people of similar ages forging careers within the agricultural industry. It seems to me that generally agriculture is still weighted towards the older generations and although this is changing the untapped talent of youngsters needs to be further utilised and further responsibility pushed onto us at earlier stages in life.

The events hosted are always informative and fascinating. Within my job recently I was tasked with negotiating a rent review for an outdoor pig unit. The most recent excursion to Phil Ellis’s pig farm at Mileham greatly enhanced my understanding of pig units and significantly aided my professional judgment. I expect similar results from the bio-digester tour as well.

Rebecca Inch

Becca Inch, Supply Chain Fields Person, BQP

Age – 24
Type of farming enterprise – Pig farming, dedicated pork suppliers to Waitrose

Day to day role
My role is varied and no day is the same which is great for me. Firstly, I oversee a group of farmers which we work in partnership with, this includes all of our free range farms, specific breed lines and organic. They have a working group who meet quarterly which I facilitate, as well as managing their dedicated fields person. Secondly, I work with the Agricultural and Commercial teams at Waitrose on initiatives within the supply chain. This includes work with the WFPLSG, visits, knowledge transfer, supply and demand. I have also been involved with our development project which has encompassed a number of initiatives over the past seven years to encourage new entrants into our sector. This includes; Fresh Start Pig Academies, engagement with local colleges, publicity (articles, awards etc.), CSR visits for local colleges, schools and young farmers, as well as managing our agricultural pages on the website. Finally I also oversee all the environmental legislation, advising/assisting our farmers on environment requirements/legislation including CAP reform, NVZ regulations and IPPC permits.

Where would you like to see yourself and the business in 5 years’ time?
I would like to grow and develop my career within the company as the company grows and develops. I would see BQP continuing to be innovative and at the forefront of the UK pig industry, to continue to be one of the best pork production companies in the UK so we are a great partner for our farmers and a fantastic supplier for our customer.

What does being a part of the Next Generation Group mean to you and what do you personally gain from it?
The group is such a fantastic opportunity for many different reasons. Every meeting I increase my agricultural knowledge and although the topics are not always related to my job, they usually are. The meeting on soil compaction and precision farming at the Salmon’s may not of been relevant for me, however, it really helped to focus my mind on what our outdoor pig farmers can do better to work into an arable rotation. It is also a fantastic way to build networks in the local Agricultural industry, which is key as we as a company are focused on growth, the next generation and building a sustainable supply chain.

Ed Salmon

Ed Salmon, N E Salmon Ltd

Age – 25
Type of farming enterprise – Arable, all combinable crops

Day to day role
Crop rotation planning, farm budgeting and machinery replacement, combine driver, relief drilling.

Where would you like to see yourself and the business in 5 years’ time?
In 5 years fully in charge of the running of the business and to be BASIS and FACTS qualified. Would like to have expanded our arable operation. In five years the farm will be fully into the 12m CTF system and hopefully seeing the benefits of this through better soil structure etc.

What does being a part of the Next Generation Group mean to you and what do you personally gain from it?
It’s great to catch up with like-minded people that I don’t normally see very often to share ideas and problems. It is good to bounce ideas off of people and have another viewpoint on your own business as well as seeing how other businesses operate.